28 July 2007

RP software group slams poaching by Singapore recruiters

"Poaching" is the word. I'm not going to refer a link because sooner or later this subject will going to take a heavy beating and will be removed or "archived" online. But let me share what the problem is according to the article.

"The Philippine Software Industry Association (PSIA) has expressed alarm over the rampant recruitment of Filipino software professionals by Singaporean companies.According to the PSIA, over the past two years, some of its member-companies have observed a growing number of agencies from Singapore that send representatives to Manila to recruit software engineers."

And PSIA's solution:

"To address the situation, the PSIA has requested the Singapore government to impose additional requirements on Filipinos securing work visas, including a copy of the applicant's resignation letter and clearance from his or her latest employer."



What is the situation this organization is referring to? First, the situation is, they are having a hard time keeping the best people in their companies for one very simple reason, the engineer is way too UNDERPAID! If by just flying three hours away from home to increase their value three times as much who cares about resignations and clearances? And I don't think Singapore government will really care for something that is against their local business interests. I hope Mr. Fermin Taruc, the President of PSIA, gets the drift.

On the bigger picture, Mr. Fermin Taruc. Foreign investors are pouring in to Singapore and they have a bigger problem to solve such as augmenting the much-needed resources than all your whinings out there. And I think PSIA should focus on how to attract multinational businesses in the Philippines so that the industry remains competitive

The organization is avoiding the real issue here. That is giving the software engineers the proper compensation they deserve that is good enough for them to stay home. Just raise the salary bar, I don't see any reason why it can not be done since Philippines is one of the progressive countries these days. Don't paint the country as the destination for low labor cost because it's starting to backfire now. Rather paint it as the destination to for multinational companies to setup shop and hire highly-trained, skilled professionals that they need to get the job done with proper compensation. Just raise the bar and compete. Don't whine.

On the final note.

"The world looks to Singapore as a role model in terms of law and order, discipline, and progressive government policies. This is why the PSIA believes that, in the spirit of fair trade, the Singapore government can make improvements in regulating the hiring and recruitment process in the Philippines,"


I think in one of your secret meetings you could have uttered the words that sounds like "no such thing as fair trade". Fair trade my foot!



27 July 2007

Where We Are Now?

After finishing the book Dreaming In Code by Scott Rosenberg, the first reference I found time to read from it is the 1968 NATO Software Engineering Conference at Garmisch, Germany. While reading the highlights, one item that caught my attention which until now is the torn to every geek's pride:

"the difficulties of meeting schedules and specifications on large software projects"


Thirty-nine years later, no one has found the easy way out. Regardless of the new tools, regardless of new methodologies and techniques to make development easier and faster. We still miss the dot, same mistakes are still committed over and over again. At this point in time, our systems should be in the stage where it can actually "heal" itself, I am not referring to uber artificial intelligence stuff [yet], just the plain software that we use for our daily life.